Some coverage of our office (and business) expansion...

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Gawker Just Signed A 15-Year Lease On A Massive New Office

This is just the latest sign that the online media space is booming now. A few years ago, people thought journalism, and media, were in big trouble. Those people seem to be wrong. Last month, BuzzFeed raised $50 million at an $850 million valuation. Vox raised $40 million last year. Business Insider raised $12 million in March. And now Gawker is expanding.

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This is just the latest sign that the online media space is booming now. A few years ago, people thought journalism, and media, were in big trouble. Those people seem to be wrong. Last month, BuzzFeed raised $50 million at an $850 million valuation. Vox raised $40 million last year. Business Insider raised $12 million in March. And now Gawker is expanding.

In his memo to staff, Denton says "revenues from direct advertising and e-commerce are running 32% ahead of last year. The monthly US audience across the eight core brands hit 80m in August, 63% ahead of a year ago."

"The online media market is white hot right now," says Denton. "You don't get to choose when media industry is booming. These things tend to rise in tandem, when you are doing well that's when rents are up."

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Business Insider

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Nick Denton Says Gawker Media Is Booming, Moving — And Fighting the Good Fight

Remember when Gawker was a single site dedicated to skewering New York's media elite?

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That was a long time ago! Now Nick Denton's blog empire boasts eight sites, with 280 employees, and Denton says they're generating 80 million uniques a month. Time for a fancy new office, he says, in a memo he just sent to his staff.

More interesting, for longtime Denton-watchers, may be the way he describes his company's role in the world: "At stake is not just our own long-term future, but the viability of intelligent independent media in a sector dominated by hype-fueled ventures, media conglomerates and tech giants," he writes. "For want of others seeking the role, we are the guardians of independent media."

That's not the kind of thing Denton would ever have said in the past — he'd be the guy who would skewer someone who described himself that way. But he'd only get around to doing it after he posted pictures of Brett Favre's penis or Hulk Hogan's sex tape.

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Via IM, Denton says this kind of thinking is the product of "New Denton," who I gather showed up in time for his wedding in May.

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Gawker Media moves uptown

It is a big move for the media company, which has been based in SoHo since it was founded in Denton's apartment in 2002. Gawker's current offices, at 210 Elizabeth St., are just a few blocks away from Denton's apartment and his favorite restaurant, Balthazar.

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But the rapidly-expanding company needs more space, and a source told Capital that there was no office space large enough to house the company near its current location. An added benefit of the new location, which is in between Union Square and Madison Square Park, is an easier commute for most staffers (if not Denton).

"From 17th Street, Gawker Media will have its own walk-up entrance. That will provide the cultural continuity with our longtime Nolita space. (We couldn't imagine mischievous bloggers going through the main lobby.) For staff coming from Williamsburg and several other Brooklyn locations, the subway commute will be seven minutes shorter," Denton wrote in the memo.

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"The office will be on the second and third floors, with a public and performance space connecting the two. That will be open, a thoroughfare designed to promote random interaction. By contrast, the working space will be arranged in what we call studios, spaces contained on three sides designed for teams of half a dozen people or so to collaborate on projects without disturbing others," Denton wrote in the memo.

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"The studio spaces have standard dimensions, defined by the structure of the building. But each will be furnished according to each team's desires. I imagine the Deadspin studio will be an absolute pigsty," Denton told Capital in a gchat conversation.

Capital New York

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Nick Denton to Gawker's VC-guzzling competitors: You're drunk

There's an irony in Gawker, which regularly has played the rebel, now casting itself in a more conservative light. It has steered clear of venture capital while competitors like BuzzFeed, Vox Media and Business Insider have raked in tens of millions of it.

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BuzzFeed and the like might not be to Denton's taste, but he agrees with them on the central role of technology in media companies. For Gawker, that means Kinja, its blogging platform that Denton sees as "our model for the future of independent media."

Digiday

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Gawker Media is headed uptown

Gawker will have its own entrance on 17th Street, which means that employees won't be subjected to a corporate lobby. "Can you imagine Hamilton Nolan putting up with that shit?" Mr. Denton asked the Observer.

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The new location is also prime for the mostly Brooklyn-dwelling staffers, and according to Mr. Denton, will lessen the commute from Williamsburg and several other Brooklyn locations by seven minutes.

There will be other changes to the space, as well. "The office will be on the second and third floors, with a public and performance space connecting the two. That will be open, a thoroughfare designed to promote random interaction," Mr. Denton wrote. "By contrast, the working space will be arranged in what we call studios, spaces contained on three sides designed for teams of half a dozen people or so to collaborate on projects without disturbing others."

New York Observer